Waiting For My Ship to Come In

The vessel is coming.

Every year, McMurdo—enormous Antarctic city that it is—uses far more supplies than it would be economical to bring down by plane. So once a year, at the end of the season when the sea ice is a bit more navigable, ships come in bearing fuel and other necessities. Food, materials, parts, T-shirts for the store, you name it. An icebreaker (the Oden, this year) makes a path for the resupply ships through the remaining sea ice near shore.

This is an enormous undertaking. The fuel tanker arrived a few days ago, shortly after we got back from the field, and the fuelies (e.g. the people tasked with moving fuel around and getting it where it’s needed) have been working long hours all week to get it offloaded.



The enormous fuel tanker looks into the midnight sun. Scott's hut is visible behind it, a little ways to the right of the No Smoking sign.

Tomorrow, or so I am given to understand, The Vessel is due to come in. I don’t know much about The Vessel (as it is universally known) except that it will be taking many of our ice cores back to the States, but I do know what effects it’s having on the town. Dozens (hundreds?) of temporary helpers from the U.S. Navy have arrived to help offload it. The town’s supply staff will be working practically nonstop. Some of the inessential functions of the station are essentially shut down for the week to ensure that everyone concentrates on the enormous task at hand. Big areas of the station are restricted or entirely off limits.

In the meantime, we’re still busy processing all our samples to get them onto the vessel (we cut up the ice cores in record time, actually) and making pictures of bubbles–which I ought to post about soon.

Bubbles!

Oh, by the way, the resupply ships dock at a pier that is made largely of ice—it’s just seawater pumped into the shape of a pier during the colder parts of the season, with a little bit of a framework (I think) to help it keep its shape. It’s several meters thick. Here they are blasting the edge off of it to get it ready for the tanker, which is visible in the background.

BOOM

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One Response to “Waiting For My Ship to Come In”

  1. Ice roads and igloos « Squid on the Ice Says:

    […] loss is bemoaned in the article at the top of this post. Or the ice pier at McMurdo, mentioned in this post and shown below being trimmed to size by several explosive charges: […]

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